Skills

Levels

Sentence Connectors

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She drinks coffee. He drinks tea.

She drinks coffee, but he drinks tea.

She drinks coffee, and he drinks tea.

She drinks coffee; he drinks tea.

Although she drinks coffee, he drinks tea.

She drinks coffee although he drinks tea.

Although she drinks coffee, but he drinks tea.

She drinks coffee; however, he drinks tea.

She drinks coffee. However, he drinks tea.

She drinks coffee. He, however, drinks tea.


(Two separate sentences)

(Coordination)

(Both ideas are equal)

(Closely related ideas)

(Subordination)

(One idea is stronger)

(INCORRECT!)

(Sentence connector)

(Stronger break between ideas)

(Variation)

Remember:

A period (.) provides the strongest break between ideas.

A semicolon (;) is next, and a comma (,) provides the weakest separation.

Coordinators provide connection between equal ideas.

(and, but, or, nor, so, for, yet)

Examples:


Mom and Dad


red or green


She stayed, but he left.

Subordinators provide connection between unequal ideas.

(because, although, when, while, if, as, since, whenever, wherever?)

Example:

He didn't go to work because he was sick.

Although John was unhappy, he still smiled.

Sentence Connectors provide connection between large groups of ideas/sentences. (usually paragraphs)

(therefore, otherwise, thus, in conclusion, furthermore?)

]

For Practice: See

Connecting Words (from The Internet TESL Journal)

See also:
Grammar: Conjunctions and Linking Words

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Last updated: 15 February, 2010 02:43:16