ESLGold.com - The world's biggest and best ESL resource online  Great Resources For Teaching & Learning English  
 
                            Follow ESLgold                 

JOIN THE ESLgold COMMUNITY

Win an Apple iPod

We will enter you into the drawing for the iPod on December 31st and add you to our monthly newsletter. Welcome!

 

 Skills
 
Speaking
  Listening
  Reading
  Writing
  Grammar
  Vocabulary
  Business English
  Pronunciation
  TOEFL/TOEIC
  Idioms

 Levels
 
Low Beginning
  High Beginning
  Low Intermediate
  High Intermediate
  Advanced

  

   

   

   

   


 

ESL Grammar Resources

Adverbs

 

Adverbs are used to describe actions. They may come before or after a verb, but not between a verb and its object.

Mrs. Jenner softly sang. (Most common word order.)

Mrs. Jenner softly sang. (Also possible.)

Mrs. Jenner softly sang a lullaby.

Mrs. Jenner sang a lullaby softly.

Mrs. Jenner sang softly a lullaby. (Not correct.)

Adverbs may come between a main verb and its auxiliaries.

Mrs. Jenner is softly singing a lullaby.

Mrs. Jenner softly is singing a lullaby. (Not correct.)

Mrs. Jenner has been softly singing that lullaby for a long time.


 

Some time and frequency adverbs are "movable." That is, they can be placed at various points in a sentence.

Yesterday I visited the dentist.

I visited the dentist yesterday.

Jack Prompt is here already.

Jack Prompt is already here.

Caution: Even though some adverbs can be used in certain sentence positions, others can not.

I yesterday visited the dentist. (Not okay.)

I already visited the dentist. (Okay.)

Already I visited the dentist. (Not okay.)

Adverbs such asquiteveryreallyextremely, and absolutely are used to modify adjectives and other adverbs.

They come directly before the words they describe.

Greg is quite happy with his new boss.

Sue eats very slowly.

You're absolutely right!


Many adverbs can be formed by adding –ly to adjectives:

Carl is a quick runner.

Carl runs quickly.

Some adverbs are identical to adjectives in form. Others are completely different.

Carl is a fast runner. (Adjective)

Carl runs fast. (Adverb)


Jill is a good student. (Adjective)

Jill studies well. (Adverb)

Be careful with words like hardlyandlately, which have no relation to the adjectives/adverbshardandlate.



ESL Videos to help you speak English

ESLgold.com Videos








                   



 

   
Phrases for Conversation
Conversation Topics
Today's News Stories
Language Tutors
Speaking Situations
English Conversation Partners
Speaking Tasks
Articles for Discussion

  

  



What's New?

Free-English-Study.com

Places to Study

Practice Your English

Daily Lessons

Join Us on Facebook!

Verb List

Job Center

TESOL Courses

Videos

Words in the News

Pictures, Words and Audio

Grammar Explanations

Business Expressions

Teacher Resources

ESLgold Dictionary

Reading Exercises

Todays-Talking-
Topics.com


Textbook
Recommendations


Resources for Success

Current Topics

Humor

Software and CDs

Word of the Day

Academic Vocabulary
Quizzes


Information Articles
















































© Copyright 2014-2015 ESLgold.com - All Rights Reserved Worldwide - Arlington, VA, USA
TOEFL and TOEIC are registered and administered by Educational Testing Service (ETS).
No connection with Eslgold.com is implied.

W
ebsite designed and developed by infocentre.biz


 

 

 

" >

Google+